Archive for Search

Mobile Search Focuses On Local Search

There are almost 3 times as many cell phones in the world then computers. So it’s no surprise that Google sees mobile search as it’s major opportunity for revenue growth. Since Google makes most of its money by selling search based advertising, all they need to do is increase the number of people that search.

The interesting thing about cell phone search is that it’s often used for different reasons than normal search. For example, someone might with a cell phone is more likely to be searching for information relevant to being on the road in some particular place. Thus, their searches are more likely to be seeking local information.

At SeaWaves, we are aggressively trying to identify ways that we can get involved in local mobile search, and our plans are to utilize our Jersey Shore website site as testing ground.

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Building Wide-Net Resource Articles

A wide-net resource article is a single article that targets the long tail of a popular search term. The wide-net resource article does not attempt to compete directly at the level of the popular search term, but rather it uses the popular search term as the foundation for multiple qualified phrases built from the popular search term.

Let me explain by using an example. Over at College Crunch, we have built a wide-net resource around the phrase “starting salary” – but we are not really interested in that specific phrase. Rather, we are interested in phrases like “starting salary for engineers” or “average starting salary for biochemists”

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When Google Underappreciates A Website

One of my favorite blogs that we run here at SeaWaves is called One Big Health Nut. From the summer of 2007 to the summer of 2008 it was updated daily with really interesting health facts.

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Relaunching Old, Stale Sites

A SeaWaves website called The Common Sense Investor has been sitting idle for well over 2 years.

The site does not get very much traffic at this point. However, we are in the process of resuscitating it with the hopes of getting traffic up below the 100k Alexa range.

What are our challenges?

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